Hello and welcome back to the molpigs newsletter! All the past podcasts and tutorial can be found here. Enjoy! Feel free to hang out at the molpigs Forum!

  1. Lab Pigs: #2 Josie Kishi
  2. We will chat with Dr. Yuan-Jyue Chen soon!
  3. [29–31 March]: Online Workshop on nucleic acids, synthetic biology and artificial life
  4. Interested in helping out, sharing something interesting, or have an idea for something we could do?

1. Lab Pigs: #2 Josie Kishi

We chatted with Dr. Josie Kishi about Primer Exchange Reaction (PER) and her research experience, challenges and advice. Check it out here!

Josie Kishi‘s interest in molecular programming was sparked when she took an elective course in biomolecular computing during college. She went on to work with Peng Yin and others at the Wyss Institute, where her primary focus was to develop the Primer Exchange Reaction (PER) synthesis method. She showed how PER cascades can be used to perform logical operations and record temporal molecular events (Nature Chemistry 2017) and for generating long single-stranded concatemers for amplifying multiplexed fluorescence imaging signal (Nature Methods 2019). Josie holds a B.S. in Computer Science from Caltech and a Ph.D. in Systems Biology from Harvard.


2. We will chat with Dr. Yuan-Jyue Chen soon!

We will soon talk with Dr. Yuan-Jyue Chen! Please send us your questions by the 25th!

Yuan-Jyue Chen is a senior researcher at Microsoft Research. He is also an affiliate professor in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. His research focuses on DNA Storage and DNA computing. He collaborate closely with Molecular Information System Lab (MISL) from University of Washington to make DNA storage a reality. Prior to Microsoft, he received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from University of Washington in 2015, advised by Georg Seelig. His PhD project was a collaboration between the biological computation research group at MSR Cambridge and Caltech. He came to Microsoft Research as a postdoc in 2015 and became a researcher in the DNA storage group in 2017.


3. [29–31 March]: Online Workshop on nucleic acids, synthetic biology and artificial life

For more information, click here! Registration for the workshop is free, but places are limited.

Nucleic acid nanotechnology is an incredibly versatile platform for constructing rationally-designed molecular systems. Much of the current attention is focussed on self-assembling structures that are designed to reach a static equilibrium, or computational architectures that compute a single function by relaxing to equilibrium.

One of the signature features of living systems, however, is that they operate continuously rather than relaxing to equilibrium. The circuits built by synthetic biologists from re-purposed cellular components reflect this principle. Components are continuously produced and degraded, and the system is dynamically responsive to a changing environment. Feedback control architectures, which reject external perturbations to maintain certain properties of key molecular species, are a particularly elegant example.

Other researchers seek to mimic specific functions of living systems—such as replication, or cellular division—using de novo chemical designs. In doing so, they grapple with the challenges of designing and controlling far-from equilibrium systems with innovative chemical motifs.

We are gathering researchers with expertise across these disciplines for a workshop to discuss how nucleic acid engineering can be made more lifelike. In doing so, we hope to explore how nucleic acid nanotechnology can be applied more broadly to synthetic biology and the engineering of minimal life-like systems.

The workshop will take place online between the 29th and the 31st March 2021. Visit our programme page for more details on the timings and our speakers. If you would like to attend or submit a poster abstract, please visit the registration page.


4. Interested in helping out, sharing something interesting, or have an idea for something we could do?

If so, please get in touch with us! Shoot us an email at contributions AT <this domain>, there are loads of ways you can get involved, and many we haven’t even thought of, but here’s a few ideas of what you could do:

We’re looking forward to getting to hear from you, and getting to know you better!